Katherine Downs

Katherine Downs is an editorial intern at The American Prospect. She recently graduated from the College of William and Mary and previously wrote for The C-Ville Weekly. Follow her @katkdowns

Recent Articles

Former U.S. Ambassador to Syria Asks: After Assad, Then What?

"It’s not clear who or what would come in his place," says Robert Ford, "and it’s a valid concern."

(AP Photo/SANA, File)
Despite stern rhetoric and barrages of missiles from Western forces, ISIL, the insurgency that calls itself the Islamic State, isn’t looking very degraded or destroyed. While the coalition led by the United States , as the crucial test of its effectiveness, focused its attention and more than 270 airstrikes on the fight for Kobani, the predominantly Kurdish town in northern Syria where small gains have been made against ISIL, the terrorist army captured two gas fields in central Syria, murdered 300 members of a Sunni tribe that dared to oppose it in Iraq, and beheaded 26-year-old American aid worker Abdul Rahman Kassig, also known as Peter. ISIL, with its extreme religious ideology, states its aim as the creation of a caliphate, a temporal expression of its draconian theology—one shared by few in the Sunni branch of Islam, for which its leaders claim to speak. More extreme than Afghanistan’s Taliban—famous for its banning of women from public life and girls...

Watch Party Dispatch: High Schoolers From Across the Country Want Change Now

For one thing, they're more concerned with voting rights than the behind-the-scenes details of national politics.

Close Up Foundation
The Hamilton Live, a Washington, D.C., nightclub, is unrecognizable on election night. One hundred twenty-two high school students from 11 states, not to mention the 30 from Mexico, fill the bottom floor of the Hamilton usually packed for late night R&B and blues. This watch party is the culmination of the second day of an election week program run by the Close Up Foundation, an organization that seeks to teach students to be engaged citizens. The atmosphere is fairly sedate for a room full of teenagers away from their parents on a school night. They don’t react to the projections coming in on the big screen in front of them. To their credit, they’re focused on speakers Matt Robbins, of the conservative organizing non-profit American Majority, and Christian Dorsey, of the non-partisan Economic Policy Institute, presenting a Republican and Democrat point of view, respectively. Robbins keeps asking if the students have questions about how things really run in Washington...