Derrick Z. Jackson

Derrick Z. Jackson is a Fellow in climate and energy at the Union of Concerned Scientists and a periodic essayist for The American Prospect and ESPN's The Undefeated. He is a 2001 Pulitzer Prize finalist, a 2018 winner from the National Society of Newspaper Columnists, and a 2017 winner from the National Association of Black Journalists.

Recent Articles

Frank Robinson: He Blazed a Trail Baseball Still Refuses to Follow

Professional sports teams have made little progress in elevating African Americans to the top slots on the field.

David Durochik via AP Frank Robinson in action during his 1966 season with the Baltimore Orioles. B ack in 1981 when I was a sports writer for Newsday, all-star relief pitcher Dave LaRoche told me about a night in the mid-1970s when he and another player on the Cleveland Indians wanted to talk to manager Frank Robinson about an issue the team was concerned about. They talked to 1 in the morning. “Frank was the first manager who said his door was open, you found it really was,” LaRoche said. Robinson, who recently died at the age 83, stood out his entire baseball career. In a statement on Robinson’s passing, Major League Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred said, "Frank Robinson's resume in our game is without parallel, a trailblazer in every sense, whose impact spanned generations. He was one of the greatest players in the history of our game, but that was just the beginning of a multifaceted baseball career.” Unfortunately, Manfred’s intended tribute encapsulates the patronizing...

Trump’s Great American Whitewash

Why do so many white people believe that the president has their best interests at heart?

(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) Donald Trump supporters listens as he speaks at a tax reform rally on November 29, 2017, in St. Charles, Missouri. W ith Donald Trump becoming in spectacular short order our most racist modern president, it must be asked: What are white people getting out of him? I know he does not speak for all white people: One in three voted for Hillary Clinton and millions of white Americans opposed his presidency and policies in 2017, as people marched to support women, science, climate, and immigrants, to name a few Trump targets. After giving 52 percent of their votes to Trump, it is a hopeful sign that white women have taken a decisively dim view of him, with a 37 percent approval rating in the latest Quinnipiac poll. But the majority of white men remain undisturbed by comments that get more applause from Klansmen and American Nazis than anyone else. After Trump’s recent “shithole” assault on Africa, Haiti, and El Salvador, 51 percent of white men told the Quinnipiac...

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