Barry Yeoman

Barry Yeoman is a writer and radio documentarian based in Durham, North Carolina. He contributes to On Earth, The Saturday Evening Post, Audubon, and Parade. Follow him @Barry_Yeoman

Recent Articles

Court Rules NC Voting Rights Rollback to Stay In Place Until After Midterm Elections

Since taking control of state government in 2011, Republicans rolled back North Carolina's progressive voting laws. A new regime of fewer voting days and voter ID requirements will be in place for November's legislative and congressional elections.

©Jenny Warburg
©JennyWarburg While a federal judge in Winston-Salem heard testimony about North Carolina’s new voting restrictions last month, activists gathered at a nearby plaza to protest the law. A federal judge has temporarily authorized North Carolina to implement a sweeping new law that threatens to reduce access to the polls, particularly for African-American, Latino, and young voters. The ruling by U.S. District Judge Thomas Schroeder, a George W. Bush appointee, is an early test of the Supreme Court’s Shelby County v. Holder decision, which overturned key parts of the Voting Rights Act. In 2000, North Carolina started rolling out efforts to make it easier to register and vote, only to yank those efforts back thirteen years later. When the state legislature was controlled by Democrats, it authorized counties to conduct up to seventeen days of early voting, including Sunday voting, which enabled black churches to transport parishioners to the polls. It also allowed citizens to register and...

Courtroom Drama: Voting Rights Paid for in Blood Under Siege in North Carolina

“It was, bar none, the worst legislative process I’ve ever been through,” Rep. Rick Glazier told the U.S. District Court.

 

©Jenny Warburg
©Jenny Warburg Norma Corley (center, in blue) of Winston-Salem was among several hundred people who attended a “March to the Polls” rally on July 7, 2014, after the first day of the preliminary-injunction hearing challenging North Carolina’s new voting law. Photographs by Jenny Warburg A t the U.S. District Court in Winston-Salem, Rick Glazier , a Democratic state legislator, took the witness stand on Tuesday, the second morning of a hearing on North Carolina’s restrictive new voting law , the enforcement of which the U.S. Department of Justice, the NAACP, and the League of Women Voters are seeking to halt. Glazier’s testimony, unflinching but emotional, offered a vivid look at the cavalier manner by which some in a torrent of new state laws have been enacted. In particular, Glazier laid out how his Republican colleagues—with almost no study or debate—stripped away more than a decade’s worth of reforms that had dramatically increased ballot access for African Americans. Voting rights...

Shifting Tactics, Moral Monday Movement Launches a New Freedom Summer

Fifty years after the murders of Schwerner, Chaney and Goodman, North Carolina activists move from civil disobedience to big voter mobilization push.

©Jenny Warburg
Photos by Jenny Warburg for The American Prospect ©Jenny Warburg The North Carolina NAACP’s Moral Freedom Summer organizers, shown here at a Raleigh protest, are fanning out across the state to register and educate voters in advance of the November 2014 elections. “ I normally wear cuff links,” the Rev. William Barber II told the 75 activists, black and white, who filled the pews at Davie Street Presbyterian Church in downtown Raleigh Monday night. “But it’s time to roll up our sleeves.” With those words, the president of the North Carolina NAACP launched the next phase of the Moral Monday movement, the broad faith-based response to the state’s recent sharp-right policy turn. The movement, founded by Barber in 2013 and backed by dozens of church and advocacy groups, is temporarily shifting its attention away from the civil-disobedience protests that yielded more than 1,000 arrests. Between now and Election Day in November, Moral Monday leaders plan to concentrate on local communities...

Moral Mondays: Capitol Showdown

Fifteen protesters have a breakthrough night in North Carolina's long-running budget battles.

Kristin Beller, an elementary-school teacher from Raleigh, N.C., addresses her colleagues during this week’s Moral Monday teach-in. Beller must work a second job to pay off her student-loan debt. (Jenny Warburg)
©Jenny Warburg Kristin Beller, an elementary-school teacher from Raleigh, N.C., addresses her colleagues during this week’s Moral Monday teach-in. Beller must work a second job to pay off her student-loan debt. B ryan Proffitt knocked on the door of North Carolina Senate President Pro Tempore Phil Berger’s office. It was locked and no one responded, which seemed odd considering that the Senate was about to open its Monday night session. “Maybe nobody’s home,” said the lanky 35-year-old high-school history teacher from Durham. He turned to Joy Boothe, a soft-spoken former chamber of commerce board president from the mountain town of Burnsville. “Do you want to try?” he asked her. “Maybe I didn’t get it right.” Boothe, who is 62, leaned in toward the powerful Republican’s door. “Senator Berger, we’re here on behalf of the teachers. We’re here on behalf of the children of North Carolina,” she called. “We’re your constituents. We would like you to hear us, sir.” That call went unanswered...

Meet the Doctor Who Went to Jail to Save North Carolina Lives

There is right, and there is wrong. And having to watch patients die because legislators refused the administration's Medicaid expansion—that's just wrong, says physician Charlie van der Horst.

@JennyWarburg
Next month in Raleigh, North Carolina, physician Charlie van der Horst is scheduled to appear before a Superior Court judge and jury to appeal his second-degree trespassing conviction stemming from his participation in the Moral Monday protests that filled the state legislature building last year. Van der Horst, an internationally recognized AIDS researcher and professor of medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, joined 28 other activists who occupied the legislative building on May 6, 2013, disobeying a police order to disperse. They were among 945 people arrested last year during twelve demonstrations. North Carolina’s Republican legislative majority has cut education funding, curtailed abortion access, and created new barriers to voting. While all those measures have offended van der Horst, his deepest concern as a doctor has been the legislature’s refusal to expand Medicaid under President Barack Obama’s Affordable Care Act. In this three-minute excerpt from...

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