Eliza Newlin Carney

Eliza Newlin Carney is The American Prospect's senior editor.

 

Recent Articles

Republicans Gear Up to Eviscerate the Campaign-Finance Rules

AP Photo/Molly Riley
AP Photo/Molly Riley President-elect Donald Trump, accompanied by his wife Melania, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky in Washington on November 10, 2016. D onald Trump’s ethics conflicts and billionaire-heavy cabinet appointments are making news these days, but an even bigger special-interest bonanza is on the horizon, when Republicans make good on their plans to knock down what remains of the campaign-finance laws. A Supreme Court that includes a Trump appointee will likely uphold a constitutional challenge to the 14-year-old ban on soft (unregulated) money that is now wending its way to the high court. Contribution limits, long reviled by Republicans who now control Capitol Hill, are on the chopping block . Most alarmingly, Trump has pledged to end the ban on partisan political activity by charitable groups, raising the specter of what one tax expert has called “Charity PACs” that would operate in total secrecy while handing wealthy donors a federal subsidy...

Will Trump’s Administration Be an Ethics-Free Zone?

AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast
AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, File Donald Trump, right, talks with The Associated Press as his son, Donald Jr., gives an interview, at the Trump International Hotel and Tower in Chicago. V ice President-elect Mike Pence did his best to put a Band-Aid on Donald Trump’s hemorrhaging credibility when he reportedly removed lobbyists this week from the White House transition team, but it’s going to take a lot more than that to fix Trump’s ethics mess. Having pledged, in his words , to “send the special interests packing,” have an “honest, ethical, and responsive” government, and, yes, “drain the swamp,” Trump has now reneged on one of his core promises to voters within days of winning election. He’s stacked his transition team with Wall Street, K Street, and corporate insiders, he’s peddling an unconvincing ethics reform plan that’s going nowhere on Capitol Hill, and he’s handed his business empire over to his children in a supposed “blind trust” that ethics experts say does nothing to...

Defending Democracy Just Got a Whole Lot Harder

AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File
AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File In this Tuesday, November 8, 2016, file photo, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump pumps his fist as he arrives to speak at a campaign rally in Grand Rapids, Michigan. F or democracy advocates, this year’s presidential race offered plenty of fuel to stoke their overriding fears: that big money is drowning out ordinary Americans, and that ballot restrictions are violating voting rights. But the presidential race that will install Donald Trump in the White House has also exposed fresh democracy threats on a host of new and disturbing fronts. Once honored as the American political system’s watchdog, the media see their credibility and efficacy in tatters. The head of the FBI violated rules against public comment on pending investigations and interfering in an election. A national political party cast aside its most treasured principles to rally behind a candidate uniquely unqualified to serve as commander-in-chief. Dirty tricks exposed the nation to...

From “Trumpkin” to “Trumpista,” Trump-Inspired Words Proliferate

Whether or not Donald Trump wins this election, his candidacy will have added several new words to the nation’s vocabulary.

From Trumpnik to Trumpista, Trumpian and Trumpism, words to describe Trump’s followers, ideology, and movement have popped up in print, on the air, and on the internet. There are trending Twitter hashtags such as #Trumpkin, which could alternately mean a Trump devotee or a Halloween pumpkin in the likeness of the orange-haired GOP nominee. There was also the #NeverTrump movement, and talk of the “Trump Effect.” Here is a brief glossary of the Trump-inspired words that have, for the moment at least, entered the political lexicon:

Trumpkin

The popularity of the term Trumpkin caused some consternation on the right, prompting The Wall Street Journal’s William McGurn to chide that it was “meant at once to describe and demean” Trump’s backers. Rhyming as it does with Munchkin, Trumpkin does evoke something small, possibly ridiculous, and not to be taken seriously. Munchkin, in turn, calls to mind the Wizard who created a fantastic but deceptive show in the Land of Oz, giving Trumpkin added resonance. Trumpkin also took on a second meaning last month, as jack-o’-lanterns carved to look like Trump became the rage, and some noted with glee that pumpkin pulp made the perfect hair.

Trumpnik

If Trumpkin ruffled feathers, Trumpnik struck some conservatives as even worse, evoking as it does a Communist apparatchik—an arguably fitting moniker for fans of a candidate who likes to flatter Russian President Vladimir Putin. In one Twitter exchange about the proper moniker for Trump followers, Commentary Editor John Podhoretz declared: “It’s TrumpKIN not TrumpNIK.”

Trumpist

Trumpist is the mainstream shorthand to describe the quintessential Trump follower, who by varying accounts is a non-college-educated white male, an unemployed factory worker, a reactionary with racist inclinations, or any American who’s angry, worried, and economically insecure. Thus The Economist wonders, “What might a Trumpist Republican Party look like?” And Ross Douthat, of The New York Times, warns that it’s not hard to imagine post-election “armed clashes between Trumpist militias and left-wing protesters.” Douthat also wins a wordsmithing prize for referencing, in the same story, the possibility that some Trump supporters will cheer a “Trumperdammerung” should he lose.

Trumpista

For those who don’t refer to Trump followers as Trumpers, Trumpniks, or Trumpkins, Trumpistas has emerged as an alternative. Trumpistas sound a bit revolutionary, like the Sandinistas who belong to Nicaragua’s democratic socialist party. When Kathleen Parker described the genteel shock that followed Trump’s crass comments at the Alfred E. Smith Memorial Foundation dinner last month, The Washington Post fittingly headlined her story: “Elites booed, Trumpistas cheered.”

Trumpian

Trumpian describes all things Trump, good or bad. When The St. Louis Post-Dispatch endorsed Democrat Tammy Duckworth over GOP incumbent Mark Kirk for U.S. Senate in Illinois, the paper referenced Kirk’s attempt to insult Duckworth’s Thai parentage as “a racist comment of Trumpian proportions.”

Trumpism

The movement spawned by Trump is best known as Trumpism, by some accounts an uprising of Americans who think the system is “rigged” against them. “Win or lose, the Trump effect will be felt long after the election,” Showtime President David Nevins recently told The Washington Post in an article titled: “Trumpism isn’t going away.”

Such Trump-inspired words’ staying power will hinge entirely on whether he wins or loses. A Trump win would no doubt enshrine these and many other Trump variants in the dictionary forever. A Trump loss would give them less cachet. One word that will stick around no matter what—a word that existed long before “the Donald” came along, and that may capture him best of all—is trumpery. On October 20, the word-lovers’ website Wordsmith circulated trumpery as its “Word of the Day” with the following definition:

trumpery
(TRUHM-puh-ree)
noun
1. Something showy but worthless.
2. Nonsense or rubbish.
3. Deceit; fraud; trickery.

Time for an ACLU Shift on Campaign Finance?

Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call via AP Images
Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call via AP Images Democracy Spring protesters calling for the end of big money in politics march to the Capitol steps on the East Plaza of the Capitol on Wednesday April 13, 2016. N ow that Georgetown constitutional law professor David Cole has been named the American Civil Liberties Union’s next national legal director, his April article in The Atlantic on “How to Reverse Citizens United ” delivers a second punch. Cole’s article gives campaign-finance reform advocates a blueprint for how to overturn the Supreme Court’s controversial 2010 ruling to deregulate campaign spending, which has ushered in a flood of secret big money unseen since Watergate, and has fueled mounting public anger over political corruption. Yet Cole’s new employer sided squarely with the Supreme Court in Citizens United v. FEC , arguing as it has in a string of cases going all the way back to Buckley v. Valeo in 1976 that limits on political spending trample on the First Amendment. So what...

Pages