Eyal Press

Eyal Press is a contributing writer at The Nation and the author of Absolute Convictions: My Father, a City, and the Conflict that Divided America, just out in paperback from Picador.

Recent Articles

Neglect for Sale:

O n April 14, 1998, two days after Easter, Janice Lacy called the Appleridge group home in Houston, Texas, to see how her sister Trenia had spent the holiday. "They told me she'd had a nice Easter and was asleep," says Janice, recalling her conversation with a caregiver at the home where Trenia and five other mentally retarded women lived. The next morning, around 10:00 a.m., Janice received a call at work informing her that Trenia had been rushed to the hospital in the middle of the night. Twenty-four hours later, Trenia Wright was dead. Janice was never told the circumstances that led to her sister's sudden death. But after the body was brought to Dallas to be buried alongside Trenia's father, the family grew curious enough to contact a lawyer. Hospital records and an investigation by the Texas Department of Human Services soon revealed that Trenia's Easter Sunday was anything but nice. That evening a group of male visitors had come from a nearby home to share an Easter dinner with...

Neglect for Sale

O n April 14, 1998, two days after Easter, Janice Lacy called the Appleridge group home in Houston, Texas, to see how her sister Trenia had spent the holiday. "They told me she'd had a nice Easter and was asleep," says Janice, recalling her conversation with a caregiver at the home where Trenia and five other mentally retarded women lived. The next morning, around 10:00 a.m., Janice received a call at work informing her that Trenia had been rushed to the hospital in the middle of the night. Twenty-four hours later, Trenia Wright was dead. Janice was never told the circumstances that led to her sister's sudden death. But after the body was brought to Dallas to be buried alongside Trenia's father, the family grew curious enough to contact a lawyer. Hospital records and an investigation by the Texas Department of Human Services soon revealed that Trenia's Easter Sunday was anything but nice. That evening a group of male visitors had come from a nearby home to share an Easter dinner with...

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