Gabrielle Gurley

Gabrielle Gurley is The American Prospect’s deputy editor.

Recent Articles

The Romney Gambit

Mitt Romney’s willingness to consider serving in a Trump cabinet should come as no surprise.

John Angelillo/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images
John Angelillo/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images President-elect Donald Trump sits at a table with former Governor Mitt Romney at Jean Georges Restaurant on November 29, 2016 in New York City. T here are denizens of Planet Media who have worked themselves into a state of high dudgeon over the prospect of Mitt Romney serving as secretary of state in the Trump administration. In these tellings, Romney is either a sellout , a hypocrite, or a suck-up. (Or a flip flopper or a shapeshifter, to use terms in vogue during his two failed presidential bids.) The underlying sentiment seems to be: Why would Romney want to work for a man he repeatedly denigrated during a toxic election, who was more than happy to match him insult for insult, and who may be setting him up for a major fall? But being shocked, shocked that Romney wants to set aside his reservations about Trump to serve in his administration ignores the arc of Romney’s career. There is nothing surprising about the former Massachusetts...

Q&A: Straight Talk From Maine on Why Trump Won

A veteran Democratic state lawmaker breaks down how a large swath of a rural blue state went red.

AP Photo/Michael C. York
AP Photo/Michael C. York State Senator-elect at the Maine Democratic Convention in Bangor, Maine. O n Election Day, Maine voters approved five ballot questions that legalized recreational marijuana, authorized a multimillion-dollar transportation bond bill, slapped a flat tax on earners making more than $200,000, changed election rules to allow voters to rank state and federal candidates, and raised the minimum wage. A gun background-check question failed—no surprise in a state with little gun violence and a strong hunting culture. For Maine Democrats, these five referendum victories were the only real bright spots in an election that left them stunned by defeat. It wasn’t supposed to be this way. In 2008 and 2012, Maine went solid blue for Barack Obama. This year, except for a few towns along the Canadian border, Donald Trump captured rural northern and inland Maine, while Hillary Clinton prevailed in the state’s urbanized southern, coastal regions. Under Maine’s apportionment rules...

Trump’s Own Blacks

Ben Carson as Secretary of Education? Farce becomes tragedy.

(Photo: AP/Christian Murdock/The Gazette)
(Photo: AP/Christian Murdock/The Gazette) Ben Carson speaks during a rally on Friday, November 4, 2016, at the Classical Academy in Colorado Springs. D onald Trump’s “What have you got to lose?” appeal did not move African Americans. There’s been some media interest in the significance of the 8 percent of the black vote that Trump gained compared to Mitt Romney’s 7 percent haul in 2012, but a one-percentage-point uptick does not a political realignment make. Hillary Clinton ran away with 88 percent of the black vote, winning 94 percent of black women and 80 percent of black men, winning the overall popular vote only to get crushed by the Electoral College. But the Republicans won’t conduct a post-Romney autopsy this time around, because they threw in their chips with Trump and cashed out beyond their wildest dreams. What can African Americans expect from a Trump administration? Nothing bodes well at this juncture, but one thing bears watching: Under an unreconstructed bigot, there may...

Does Clinton’s Campaign Lack the Human Touch in Black Communities?

The absence of an early, focused voter mobilization campaign may be taking a toll.

AP Photo/Chris O'Meara
AP Photo/Chris O'Meara Supporters chant as they wait for a speech by Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, Tuesday, November 1, 2016, in Dade City, Florida. I n the waning days of the most divisive contest in modern presidential history, early-voting trends suggest that many African Americans voters have checked out of Election 2016. No Democratic candidate would ever be likely to match Barack Obama’s historic success or his ability to turn out black voters (save perhaps Michelle Obama, who has vowed never to run for public office) Hillary Clinton’s equally historic quest to be the first woman president has gotten lost amid the media’s 24/7 coverage of Donald Trump’s daily eruptions. But that’s just one reason why some African American voters are underwhelmed by the prospect of a Clinton presidency. Another fundamental problem is a Democratic ground game that may completely eclipse Republican efforts nationwide, but which pales in comparison to the Democrats’ African...

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