Harold Meyerson

Harold Meyerson is the editor-at-large at The American Prospect and a columnist for The Washington Post. His email is hmeyerson@prospect.org

Recent Articles

Obama's Immigration Move About Much More Than Politics

(Esther Yu-Hsi Lee for ThinkProgress)
(Esther Yu-Hsi Lee for ThinkProgress) Demonstrators at a protest on the national Mall in Washington, D.C., on October 8, 2013. This essay originally appeared on the op-ed page of The Washington Post , where the author has a column. T he commemorations of the 25th anniversary of the Berlin Wall’s fall have thrust into the public spotlight the border guard who ordered the gates opened. The subject of both a new German-language book and film, one-time Stasi Lt. Col. Harald Jäger has recounted why he defied his orders. And his story couldn’t be more relevant to the debate consuming our own nation. On the evening of Nov. 9, 1989, prompted by an erroneous announcement from an East German Politburo spokesman that his compatriots would be free to cross the border, thousands of East Berliners flocked to the checkpoint Jäger supervised. His superiors told him to keep the gates closed, though he could let a few people through, provided he marked the passports of those he determined were...

The Democrats' Catastrophe and the Need For a New Agenda

(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, joined by his wife, former Labor Secretary Elaine Chao, celebrates with his supporters at an election night party in Louisville,Tuesday, November 4, 2014. McConnell won a sixth term in Washington, with his eyes on the larger prize of GOP control of the Senate. The Kentucky Senate race, with McConnell, a 30-year incumbent, fighting off a spirited challenge from Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes, has been among the most combative and closely watched contests that could determine the balance of power in Congress. D emocrats had ample reason to fear that this year’s midterm elections would not go well for them, but bad doesn’t begin to describe what happened to them—and the nation—yesterday. Catastrophic is more like it. Democrats didn’t just lose the Senate; they lost statehouse after statehouse. They didn’t just lose the red states; they lost the purple and the blue. They lost the governorships of Maryland...

Meet the Working Families Party, Whose Ballot Line is in Play in New York

The WFP has amassed the power to turn progressive ideas into law. But a controversial attempt to work a deal with incumbent New York Governor Cuomo has put its ballot line at stake.

Editor's note: In New York's 2014 gubernatorial race, more than just who wins the governor's mansion is on the line. Also at stake is the automatic ballot access enjoyed by the Working Families Party, the force behind the economic justice issues that have dominated the state's progressive politics in recent times—fast-food worker pay and conditions, paid sick leave for New York City workers, and a living minimum wage.

Gaga and Bennett: Making a Great American Art Form Hip Again

Jazz singers don’t usually rise to the top of the charts, but Cheek to Cheek topped Billboard’s list of best-sellers in the week after its release.

PBS
T ony Bennett has long been as much a jazz singer as a pop singer, though I readily acknowledge that the distinction between the two has always been fuzzy. This has been particularly true throughout the second coming of his career—his rise again to popular and critical acclaim over the past two decades. The onetime crooner and belter of “I Left My Heart in San Francisco” can’t quite hold those long notes like he used to or glissando up and down the scale without an occasional unintended bump. The marvel is, he’s still a great singer at age 88, in no small part by jazzing his singing even more than he used to. Bennett’s new album with Lady Gaga, Cheek to Cheek , is an exhilarating textbook, if such a thing may be, of jazz singing, in which Gaga, prodded by Bennett’s foxy grandpa, discovers her inner Ella Fitzgerald. Jazz singers don’t usually rise to the top of the charts, but Cheek to Cheek topped Billboard ’s list of best-sellers in the week after its release, and a concert version...

The Seeds of a New Labor Movement

SEIU’s David Rolf—virtuoso organizer and mastermind of Seattle’s $15 minimum wage campaign—says labor needs radically new ways to champion worker interests. 

This article is from the Fall 2014 issue of The American Prospect magazine.

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