J. Goodrich

J. Goodrich is a recovering economist and the sole proprietor of the political blog Echidne of the Snakes. She also blogs for TAPPED.

Recent Articles

DISENFRANCHISING ANN COULTER.

This would, of course, be one of the outcomes if Ann Coulter 's "modest proposal" about women losing their suffrage would be carried out. How does she reconcile being the voice of scorn and contempt towards women and its object, too? I'm glad I don't know the answer to that, even if it's all only a performance. Garance 's earlier post on this topic is titled "Coulter Comes Out Against Women Voting". In fact, this is not the first time she has advocated the abolition of her own rights. Here are a few earlier examples: On TownHall she writes : Webb began his rebuttal by complaining that we don't have national health care and aren't spending enough on "education" (teachers unions). In other words, he talked about national issues that only are national issues because of this country's rash experiment with women's suffrage. In an interview with the U.K. Guardian : Why does she think the franchise is too big already? Who exactly has the vote who shouldn't have? "Women," she says, laughing...

HERE BE THE DRAGONS.

That charming sentence was supposedly added to old maps when the map reached an area that nobody had any knowledge about. I love the idea! To leave off the technical work of putting in mountains and rivers and lakes and just to draw some fantastic dragons in the blind spots! Sadly, "here be the dragons" was also my first reaction to reading Katherine Q. Seelye 's recent NYT piece "Women, Politics and Internet." The idea behind the piece was a clever one: Seelye asked her readers to give her opinions on whether indeed there are fewer women than men discussing politics on the net and if this is so, what might be the reason. This is clever, because I can imagine an ancient mapmaker going to the local inn and interviewing travelers about what they may have seen in some far distant place, looking for something to put in place of those dragon pictures. But it has the same problems as a strategy. What you get is individual opinions. A sample: I asked our readers if they thought more men were...

ON HATING THE CONGRESS.

The new Washington Post poll (via Kevin Drum ) gives us more detail on what lies behind the low approval ratings the Congress has received recently. While 57% of the respondents disapprove of the job performance of the Democrats in Congress, ten percent more (for a total of 67%) disapprove of the job the Republicans in Congress are doing. Imagine that. And when respondents who think that the Congress has achieved little or nothing are asked to assign blame for that 51% pin it squarely on Bush and the Republicans in Congress, whereas only 25% see the Democrats in Congress as the culprits. These findings lay to rest the conservative argument that the low approval rates of the Congress are shorthand for low approval rates of the Congressional Democrats now in majority. But of course the Democrats are not getting off shot-free, either. I was especially fascinated to learn that 55% of the poll respondents believe that they have not gone far enough in their opposition to the war in Iraq...

ECHOES FROM THE PAST.

John Bolton , the former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, has been busy giving speeches in the old and dissolute Europe. He addressed a meeting of bitter Thatcherians in Great Britain: Mr Bolton, who was addressing a fringe meeting organised by Lord (Michael) Ancram, said that the Iranian president, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, was "pushing out" and "is not receiving adequate push-back" from the west. "I don't think the use of military force is an attractive option, but I would tell you I don't know what the alternative is. "Because life is about choices, I think we have to consider the use of military force. I think we have to look at a limited strike against their nuclear facilities." He added that any strike should be followed by an attempt to remove the "source of the problem", Mr Ahmadinejad. "If we were to strike Iran it should be accompanied by an effort at regime change ... The US once had the capability to engineer the clandestine overthrow of governments. I wish we could get...

AND THE RETICENT JUSTICE SPEAKS

Clarence Thomas has written a memoir about his upbringing, his early life and his bitter Supreme Court confirmation hearings in 1991 which centered around the sexual harassment accusations levied against him by a former employee, Anita Hill . It is those hearings which most newspaper articles about his book focus on. Thomas described the hearings as a "high-tech lynching" at the time and his views appear not have changed with the mere passage of years. The Times of London quotes him on his views concerning the Democratic senators: He reserves particular scorn for the Democratic senators who tried to prevent his confirmation. One made him think of a "slave owner", while he says his worst fears about white people came to pass "not in Georgia, but in Washington, DC, where I was being pursued not by bigots in white robes but by left-wing zealots draped in flowing sanctimony". ABC News picks a slightly different quote with a similar meaning: In what Thomas describes as a "dark night of the...

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