Jamelle Bouie

Jamelle Bouie is a staff writer at The American Prospect.

Recent Articles

The Return of George Allen.

Former Republican Sen. George Allen -- last seen, as in the above video, exercising his casual racism -- has returned as a voice for the Virginia GOP’s current crop of congressional candidates: Allen said he believes it is a combination of massive federal spending and other issues such as health care reform and cap and trade that are riling voters. He said more Virginia Republican victories in November would offer a return to “common-sense Jeffersonian principles.” While he won’t discuss it, Allen’s frequent appearances at Republican gatherings across Virginia have fueled speculation that he will seek a 2012 rematch against U.S. Sen. Jim Webb. Just this week, Allen has visited the Shenandoah Valley, far western Virginia and the Southside on behalf of congressional candidates. I apologize for the inside baseball, but I think this is worth commenting on; remember, if not for a slip of the tongue, George Allen would probably be in the Senate right now, and almost certainly a contender...

Why Do Conservatives Hate Railroads?

Yesterday, The New York Times reported on Republican gubernatorial candidates who have come out against projects to create or expand rail lines in their states. So far, conservative candidates in Wisconsin, Ohio, Florida and California pledged to end the government’s nefarious plan to expand intercity rail, and create economic opportunity. Of course, this won’t happen anytime soon, since they’re still trying to win their elections. In the meantime, though, they can look to New Jersey’s Chris Christie for inspiration : The largest federal transit investment in American history is on its deathbed, reports Andrea Bernstein at Transportation Nation. Three sources have told Bernstein that New Jersey Governor Chris Christie is ready to pull the plug on the plan to double rail capacity under the Hudson River this week, though Christie denies his mind is made up. Christie plans to use the money “to patch up the state’s Transportation Trust Fund for a couple of years so that he doesn’t have to...

The Contentment Surplus.

The New York Times looks into President Obama ’s increasingly vocal efforts to energize the Democratic base for November’s elections: But Mr. Obama has aimed much of his prodding — and not a small amount of personal pique — at the liberals most deflated by the first two years of his presidency. Assuming that many independents are out of reach, White House strategists are counting on Mr. Obama to energize, cajole, wheedle and even shame the left into matching the Tea Party momentum that has propelled Republicans this year. As he holds rallies aimed at college students and minority groups, sends e-mail to his old list of campaign supporters and prepares to host a town hall-style meeting on MTV, the president essentially is appealing to his liberal base to put aside its disappointment in him. Without offering regrets for policy choices that have angered liberals, Mr. Obama argues that the Republican alternative is far worse. I’m not sure that this will do much to help; the problem for...

Joe Biden Is in This for the Long Haul.

Bob Woodward looks at the 2012 presidential election, and sees Barack Obama running with his Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton : "It's on the table," veteran Washington Post reporter Bob Woodward told CNN's John King in an interview Tuesday on John King, USA. "Some of Hillary Clinton's advisers see it as a real possibility in 2012." [...] "Now you talk to Hillary Clinton or her advisers and they say 'no, no there's not a political consideration here,'" Woodward continued. "Of course the answer is, you point out to them that her clout around the world when she goes to Europe, Asia, anywhere is in part, not just because she's Secretary of State or because she was married to President Clinton, that people see a potential future president in her." You don’t actually need to know politics to know that this is nonsense; only one president in a hundred years has run for re-election without their current vice president, and those were very special circumstances. In 1940, after fighting off...

Black People Have Other Things to Worry About.

Jeffrey Goldberg wants to know two things: First, do Republicans actually believe they can win African American voters while supporting politicians who endorse Confederacy-worship, and second, how can African Americans in the South live surrounded by a culture that regularly and unapologetically venerates the Confederacy: The true, spin-free, answer, obviously, is that the Republican Party would rather not risk offending mythopoetic white Southerners by calling the Confederacy what it actually was -- a vast gulag of slavery, murder and rape. As an electoral strategy, it's a fine one -- an immoral one, but a practical one, something that has worked for the Republicans for more than 40 years (though the gains it has made in the South have been tempered by losses in the Northeast and elsewhere). But what I don't understand is why African-Americans, in the south as well as the north, don't simply rise up as a collective and say: No more. That's it. Stop the veneration of evil men. For...

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