Jenny Warburg

Jenny Warburg is a freelance photographer and former social worker living in Durham, North Carolina. Her photographs have appeared in numerous publications including The New York Times, Time, Newsweek, US News and World Report, The Los Angeles Times, People, Rolling Stone, US Weekly, Mother Jones, The Washington Post, Ms.,The Guardian, and the Southern Poverty Law Center’s Intelligence Report. Her photos have also appeared in numerous books and on book covers, as well as in many documentary films, television documentaries and news programs.

Recent Articles

Photos from the Moral March on Raleigh

Thousands in North Carolina protested both state policy and the Trump administration.

(Photo: Jenny Warburg)
(Photo: Jenny Warburg) The Reverend William Barber II T he protest movement that has animated millions of progressives since the inauguration of President Trump gave added force Saturday to the North Carolina NAACP’s 11th Annual Moral March on Raleigh. Tens of thousands filled the streets of the state capital for the march, which is also known as the HKonJ (Historic Thousands on Jones Street) People’s Assembly. The protest featured the Reverend William Barber II, the president of the NAACP’s state chapter and leader of North Carolina’s Moral Mondays movement , a diverse coalition of progressive causes that has embraced civil disobedience in response to the state GOP’s conservative policies. Besides demonstrating against attacks on voting rights and against the state’s anti-LGBT law known as HB2, marchers also brandished signs with messages in opposition to the Trump administration and congressional Republicans, from condemnation of the travel ban to the #ShePersisted meme to pro-...

Photo Essay: Anti-Trump Protesters and Immigrant Advocates Demonstrate in New York

Trump Tower became a magnet for those protesting the election of Donald Trump.

(Photo: Jenny Warburg)
S ince Donald J. Trump’s surprise election last Tuesday, thousands of Americans have poured into the streets to protest, from Portland , where more than 100 were arrested after violence interrupted peaceful demonstrations, to Minneapolis and Phoenix . On Tuesday, hundreds of high school students in Washington, D.C. , walked out of class to march down Pennsylvania Avenue. Over the weekend, about 8,000 residents of Los Angeles marched through downtown. Trump’s hometown of New York City, where he has been working on his transition from Trump Tower, has been a magnet for massive protests against the Republican president-elect. On Saturday, protesters marched from Union Square north to Trump Tower, with signs and calls of “Not my president.” On Sunday, immigrant-rights supporters , chanting “Here to stay” to protest Trump’s campaign pledge to deport millions of undocumented immigrants, marched from the Trump International Hotel at Central Park to Trump Tower. The photos below, taken by...

In North Carolina, Backlash Against Anti-LGBT Bill Continues

Protesters gathered in Raleigh and Chapel Hill to oppose HB2, chronicled here in a photo essay.

(Photo: Jenny Warburg)
(Photo: Jenny Warburg) Mitch Xia, one of the organizers of the protests in Chapel Hill on March 29, leads the march up Franklin Street. M arch 31 marks the seventh annual International Transgender Day of Visibility, which honors the transgender community and helps raise awareness of the discrimination and the social barriers faced by transgender people. But this year, a wave of protests has overshadowed celebrations in North Carolina, where state lawmakers recently signed off on one of the most restrictive anti-LGBT laws in the country. The North Carolina law, House Bill 2 (HB2) , limits the use of multi-occupancy bathrooms, locker rooms, and shower facilities to a person’s “biological sex” and excludes sexual orientation and gender identity from the list of groups protected from discrimination in public accommodations. “The government’s priorities are the protection of its citizens, especially its women and children,” said North Carolina Lieutenant Governor Dan Forest during a recent...

Photo Essay: Vigil for Slain Chapel Hill Muslim Students

While the media lit up with arguments over whether or not Craig Hicks's execution-style killing of three young Arabs was a hate crime, the UNC community gathered to commemorate the lives of the slain. 

(Photo / Jenny Warburg)
This editor's note has been corrected to accurately state the academic affiliations of the slain students. O n February 10, Yusor Mohammad Abu-Salha was in her apartment in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, with her husband, Deah Shaddy Barakat, and her sister, Razan Mohammad Abu-Salha, when a man came in and shot the three of them, execution-style. The newlywed couple was in their early 20s; Razan Abu-Salha was 19. Barakat was a student at the University of North Carolina School of Dentistry, where his wife, Yusor, was recently accepted for admission. Razan Abu-Salha attended North Carolina State University. Neighbor Craig Hicks was subsequently charged with the murders. Law enforcement officials said that Hicks's actions stemmed from a parking dispute; Barakat's father and many others called it a hate crime motivated by the murderer's contempt for either his targets' Islamic faith, or against Muslims, period. Family and friends of Barakat and the Abu-Salbas gathered on the university...

Photo Essay: Moral Mondays' Potent Symbols and Creative Actions

So far in the 2014 North Carolina legislative session, lawmakers have witnessed weekly actions: a silent protest, a sit-in in the Speaker's office, and prayerful bread-breaking by the activists of the Moral Monday movement, chronicled here in a photo essay.

©Jenny Warburg
N orth Carolina’s 2014 legislative session, which began May 14, is now in full swing. So is the Moral Monday movement, the NAACP-led, faith-based opposition to the state’s recent dismantling of voting rights, civil liberties, and the social safety net. The movement, now in its second year, has built a solid foundation of support from a wide array of churches and issue-based organizations, including labor, immigrant, and women’s groups. This spring, as legislators have tried to limit protests and sometimes even avoid the building on Mondays, organizers have grown adept at surprising lawmakers with unannounced, targeted, and sometimes colorful actions. These photographs by Jenny Warburg chronicle the action in and around the state legislative building. --Barry Yeoman Click here to read Barry Yeoman's full account of this year's Moral Monday protests. Yeoman also built the slideshow of Warburg's photographs and wrote the captions. North Carolina's Moral Monday Movement Holding Ground in...

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