Joshua Green

Joshua Green is an editor at The Washington Monthly and a former staff writer at
The American Prospect.

Recent Articles

Be Careful What You Pray For

George W. Bush has taken pains to emphasize that his plans for faith-based initiatives are broad enough to encompass all religious sentiment. But if the experience of one college newspaper editor is an indicator, tolerance has its limits. The point was made clear recently when the U.S. Secret Service paid a visit to the editorial offices of the Stony Brook Press, a student newspaper at the State University of New York in Stony Brook, Long Island. The reason for the visit? The paper had run a piece titled "Editorial: Dear Jesus Christ, King of Kings, all I ask is that you smite George W. Bush." The author, Glenn Given, a 22-year-old senior, had jokingly asked that Dick Cheney, John Ashcroft, "and if it's not too much trouble, the rest of George W.'s cabinet" also be struck down. That hasn't happened. But Given's prayer was certainly heard by the feds. Seems that "smiting" is not the sort of faith-based initiative the president had in mind. The Secret Service interrogated Given but made...

Bad Faith

John DiIulio, head of the White House Office of Faith-Based Initiatives, resigned his post late last week. Critics have charged that the departure comes after the Bush Administration focused its faith-based efforts too narrowly on evangelical Christian churches, while leaving black churches -- whose programs DiIulio has strongly endorsed -- out in the cold. Reverend Eugene Rivers, a prominent black minister who had previously endorsed Bush's faith based initiative, lashed out at the Bush Administration, charging, "The message in Professor DiIulio's departure is that the black and the poor in the inner cities can go to hell. It sends a signal that the faith-based office will just be a financial watering hole for the right-wing white evangelists." This American Prospect article ("Bad Faith," July 30, 2001) proves Rivers is not the only leader to charge the Bush Administration with making empty promises to black churches. B ishop Harold Ray is hopping mad. "There is open conflict between...

Concern for the Masses?

I n 1956 a young seminary student named Charles Curran bet a conservative classmate that Adlai Stevenson would beat Dwight Eisenhower in the fall presidential election. When Stevenson went down to defeat that November, Curran's classmate, Edward Egan, took great pleasure in exacting payment. "He made me read Russell Kirk's The Conservative Mind ," Curran, now a professor at Southern Methodist University, told me sheepishly. In May, Egan walked onto the national stage, succeeding Cardinal John O'Connor as the archbishop of New York. And more than four decades later, Egan's staunch conservatism appears little changed. Egan has a reputation as a strict Vatican loyalist. Many believe it was his strong ties to Rome, where he worked closely with Pope John Paul II, that prompted the pope to look beyond a list of recommended successors and choose Egan instead. He is also known as a gifted administrator. (In his previous position...

Cleaning House

If Democrats win back the House of Representatives, their slim majority won't adequately reflect the magnitude of the change. The list of ranking Democrats in line to chair key committees reads like a who's who of progressive congressional leadership: Henry Waxman ( Government Reform ), George Miller ( Education and the Workforce ), John Conyers ( Judiciary ), and Charles Rangel ( Ways and Means ) are all up for committee chairmanships, while others--such as Barney Frank (Domestic and International Monetary Policy), Sander Levin (Trade), and Sherrod Brown (Health and Environment)--are poised to assume important subcommittee chairmanships. These legislators and others have already met with Democratic Minority Leader Richard Gephardt to begin forming an activist agenda that promises to contrast starkly with the past six years of Republican control. As Democratic strategists point out, a surprisingly progressive agenda is driving the presidential election. Education, prescription drugs,...

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