Manuel Madrid

Manuel Madrid is a writing fellow at The American Prospect

Recent Articles

Booze, Women, and Movies: Chuck Grassley Couldn’t Be More Wrong about Taxpayers

Grassley’s characterizations of ordinary Americans are not only callous, but also patently false.

AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite
AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley speaks with reporters on Capitol Hill trickle-downers_35.jpg I f the Senate Republican tax bill could talk, it would probably sound a lot like Chuck Grassley. During a week already rife with Republican skullduggery, the Iowa Senator did his best Scrooge impression while defending the recently passed legislation’s weakening of the estate tax: “I think not having the estate tax recognizes the people that are investing,” Grassley told reporters last week . “As opposed to those that are just spending every darn penny they have, whether it’s on booze or women or movies.” The senator’s words were callous, elitist, and, worse still, completely inaccurate. In 2015, consumers with pre-tax incomes between $15,000 and $30,000 spent nearly eight-and-a-half times less on alcohol than consumers who made $200,000 or more, according to a Bureau of Labor Statistics survey . Consumers that made between $50,000 and $70,000...

On the Edge of Deportation, Haitians Hold Out for Hope on TPS

The threat of deportation has cast a shadow over Thanksgiving for tens of thousands of Haitians living in the country under Temporary Protected Status.

AP Photo/Lynne Sladky
AP Photo/Lynne Sladky Children stand next to United States and Haitian flags as they hold signs in support of renewing Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for immigrants from Central America and Haiti now living in the United States, during a news conference in Miami B lack immigrant advocates gathered in front of the U.S. Capitol last week to tell stories of America’s Haitian communities and ask the Trump administration for a Thanksgiving “gift”: Don’t deport us. The Department of Homeland Security has until Thursday to decide on whether to renew a temporary program that allows about 50,000 Haitians to live and work in the United States. Immigrant advocacy groups have shifted into high gear to press for an extension of Temporary Protected Status (TPS), while urging legislators to devise an alternative if the DHS fails to renew protections for Haitians next week. “Anyone traveling back to Haiti can see for themselves that these conditions are inhumane. It is truly as if it was the day...

Republicans’ Disdain for Trump’s Base Oozes Into Tax Plan

Could the GOP tax plan erode Trump’s support among key parts of his base?

(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) House Speaker Paul Ryan defends the GOP tax plan on Capitol Hill on November 7, 2017. trickle-downers.jpg E very tax plan has winners and losers, and the House Republican tax plan is no different. The wealthy continue to prosper and the middle class gets the scraps. Everyone else? “The losers are going to lose badly,” says the Center for American Progress’s tax expert Seth Hanlon. But what happens if Trump’s strongest supporters are the losers losing badly? A Voter Study Group/Democracy Fund report published earlier this year identified five distinct groups of Trump voters. Trump and the GOP risk alienating two groups with their proposed tax plan, the “American Preservationists” and the “Free Marketeers,” who together make up 45 percent of the president’s base. According to the study, the “American Preservationists” are mostly made up of white working-class Americans, Trump’s core constituency. This group is the poorest of his supporters: More than half...

Between Pragmatism and Purity: Virginia Democrats Try to Come Together

Progressive and establishment Democrats in Virginia look to ride anti-Trump fervor to Election Day victories. But will that be enough to bridge the party's divisions?

AP Photo/Steve Helber People cheer during a rally for Democratic gubernatorial candidate Lieutenant Governor Ralph Northam in Richmond T ime was short, and the activists knew it. Crowded into a small living room, they listened intently as an organizer explained which doors to knock on and what words to say. The three-story home, located in Virginia’s wealthy Stafford County, a Washington suburb, had been converted into a de facto headquarters for Democratic volunteers in the area, hosting canvass launches for various candidates. They would be spending the day going after likely Democratic voters, attempting to turn out the party’s base. “We all know what happens when Democrats don’t vote,” Jennifer Carroll Foy, a candidate for Virginia’s House of Delegates, told the volunteers. “We cannot feel those same feelings that we felt on November 9, last year: horror, frustration, hopelessness.” Alarmed by Donald Trump’s surprise victory, a wave of first-time candidates, eager volunteers and...

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