Paul Waldman

Paul Waldman is the Prospect's daily blogger and senior writer. He also blogs for the Plum Line at the Washington Post, and is the author of Being Right is Not Enough: What Progressives Must Learn From Conservative Success.

Recent Articles

Don't Blame the Media

Greg Sargen t points out that in the now-infamous Pew poll in which nearly a fifth of Americans think Barack Obama is a Muslim, 60 percent of them say they learned it from the media. So should we blame the media? No, for two reasons. The first is this: Who is this "media"? When people choose that answer, they might mean Katie Couric , or they might mean Time magazine. Or they might mean Rush Limbaugh , who has taken to calling the president "Imam Obama." Or they might mean some nutball website like World Net Daily. They could mean any of these things, because they're all "the media." The second reason is the really important one: People have a great deal of trouble remembering where they learned things . This is a long-standing finding in research on media and politics. When you get a piece of information, it isn't placed in a box in your brain called "Things I learned from NBC Nightly News," with that source information linked to it forevermore. It's more likely that it gets put...

Hatred of Foreigners and Hatred of Government Are Not the Same Thing.

Politico has an interesting article titled "The New Battle: What It Means to Be an American," that manages to say barely a word about what it means to be an American, or what different people believe it means to be an American. But anyway, the point of the piece is that the right is losing interest in its old standby social issues like abortion and the threat of national gayification in favor of its new fears of socialism. Which is all well and good as a short-term strategy. But the thing about it is that it is necessarily short-term. Once the economy turns around, President Obama 's approval ratings will rise, and most of the country will no longer be concerned about most of the things Republicans are yelling about. And even Republicans themselves will stop being outraged by big government the moment the next Republican president takes office. The handy thing about social issues, on the other hand, is that they're eternal. That couple down the street with the washboard abs and...

Auto Industry Rebounding, Believe It or Not.

(Flickr/ aldenjewell ) Back in 2008, when Chrysler and GM were facing bankruptcy, conservatives started a campaign against a government bailout. In order to convince people it was a bad idea, they went around telling everyone that autoworkers were lazy and overpaid, trying to make the workers into the villain of the story; the key piece of evidence was the fabricated claim that these workers were paid an average of $72 an hour. It was a lie (the real figure was about $28, or a decidedly middle-class wage), but it did the job; in short order, opposition to the auto bailouts became conservative dogma, and most of the public ended up opposing the bailouts. While there are a lot of things to criticize about the various economic initiatives the government took in 2008 and 2009, this one seems to have worked out pretty well : General Motors took the first formal steps on Wednesday to once again sell shares publicly, highlighting a remarkable turnaround for the corporate giant a year after...

Big Brother Was a Piker

If you walk around any city in America (and a lot of other countries) these days, you'll be moving from they eye of one surveillance camera to another. Some belong to the authorities, some belong to businesses, but they create a web in which we're all being watched. It's hard not to feel a little unnerved when you think about it, even if you manage not to think about it most of the time. But you want to get unnerved? Get a load of this, from Fast Company : Biometrics R&D firm Global Rainmakers Inc. (GRI) announced today that it is rolling out its iris scanning technology to create what it calls "the most secure city in the world." In a partnership with Leon -- one of the largest cities in Mexico, with a population of more than a million -- GRI will fill the city with eye-scanners. That will help law enforcement revolutionize the way we live -- not to mention marketers. "In the future, whether it's entering your home, opening your car, entering your workspace, getting a pharmacy...

Darrell Issa, Getting Warmed Up

Rep. Darrell Issa , who will become a subpoena-issuing machine should Republicans take back the House, is apparently mad about Recovery.gov , the website where the administration puts information about the stimulus. It's pretty snappy for a government website, with all kinds of animations and interactive tools. But a new report Issa has issued says "Recovery.gov became a taxpayer-funded tool to promote false and misleading propaganda to support the Democrat-backed stimulus." Now, a certain amount of propaganda from the administration is to be expected. Your tax dollars pay Robert Gibbs ' salary, for instance, and his whole job is to tell America why the administration is totally awesome. But there are obviously limits. For instance, when the first round of George W. Bush 's tax cuts were passed in 2001, the administration spent millions of dollars to send a letter to every American household, telling them, "We are pleased to inform you that the United States Congress passed -- and...

Pages