Rachel M. Cohen

Rachel M. Cohen is a writing fellow at The American Prospect

Recent Articles

Gender Wage Gap Raises the Stakes for the American Economy

A new study connects declining female employment and the persistent gender pay gap with a lack of workplace protections for women and families. 

(Photo: Melanie Stetson Freeman via AP)
(Photo: Melanie Stetson Freeman via AP) Susan Emmons, Sarah Hart, and Helen Lyons work on the Carlisle Mosquito newspaper on deadline day. F ull-time female workers across the country still earn just 79 cents for every dollar men earn, and the gap widens further for women of color . A new report on the gender wage gap by the Economic Policy Institute, a Washington-based think tank, shines a light on why these disparities persist and what policies would most effectively eliminate them. Though encouraging women to pursue careers in fields like science and engineering carries intrinsic importance, the authors say closing existing gaps within occupations would actually eliminate 68 percent of the gender wage gap. That means figuring out why waiters earn more than waitresses with similar work experience and education could go a long way towards ending gender wage disparities. The massive increase of women working outside the home has been one of the greatest economic shifts of the 20th...

Black Organizations Say No -- or at Least, Slow Down -- to Charter Schools

The NAACP and the Movement for Black Lives cast a cold eye on education reform.

(Photo: AP/The Flint Journal-MLive.com/Jake May)
(Photo: AP/The Flint Journal-MLive.com/Jake May) Students learn and practice yoga on International Yoga Day on June 21, 2016, at The New Standard charter school in Flint, Michigan. A t its national convention in July, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, one of the nation’s premier civil-rights organizations, passed a resolution calling for a moratorium on charter schools. The resolution said, among other things, that charters have contributed to segregation, have used disproportionately high levels of punitive and exclusionary discipline, and pledged that the NAACP will seek to promote stronger investigative bodies to oversee charter school fraud, corruption, and waste. The resolution will not become official policy until the NAACP’s national board convenes later this fall, but it builds on previous resolutions passed in 2010 and 2014 that were also critical of charter schools. A coalition of more than 50 black-led organizations known as the Movement for...

Q&A: The Economic Consequences of Denying Teachers Tenure

A California court recently reversed a decision that would have weakened teacher employment protections. Economist Jesse Rothstein discusses the tradeoffs between job security and attracting new teachers.

(Photo: AP/Andreas Fuhrmann/Record Searchlight)
(Photo: AP/Andreas Fuhrmann/Record Searchlight) Third grade teacher Lynn Haskins talks to students at a school in Shingletown, California, on May 25, 2016. P olitical and legal battles surrounding teacher tenure and seniority have been raging in California over the past couple of years. In 2014, in Vergara v. California , a Los Angeles County Superior Court judge ruled that a variety of teacher job protections worked together to violate students’ constitutional right to an equal education. This past spring, in a 3–0 decision, the California Court of Appeals threw this ruling out. The American Prospect ’s Rachel Cohen interviewed Jesse Rothstein, the former chief economist at the U.S. Department of Labor and a current public policy and economics professor at the University of California, Berkeley, who testified during the Vergara trials in defense of California’s teacher tenure and seniority statutes. This conversation has been edited and condensed. Rachel Cohen: Your research suggests...

Q&A: The Education Stakes in Election 2016

A conversation with NEA President Lily Eskelsen García on what 2016 means for K-12 education.  

AP Photo/J. David Ake
AP Photo/J. David Ake, File National Education Association President Lily Eskelsen Garcia. Last October, the National Education Association, the nation’s largest teachers union, gave Hillary Clinton one of her earliest organized labor endorsements. Since then, the powerful group has been one of Clinton’s most vocal supporters. Neither Hillary Clinton nor Donald Trump have spent much time discussing public K-12 education issues during the primary season. But recently, elementary and secondary education topics have attracted more attention. Clinton began articulating her education policy ideas at union conventions this month and Republican leaders championed school choice at their national convention last week. The American Prospect’s Rachel Cohen sat down in Philadelphia with Lily Eskelsen García, the president of the three million-member NEA , to discuss the upcoming election, and what’s at stake for teachers and students. What follows is an edited and condensed transcript of that...

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