Robert Kuttner

Robert Kuttner is co-founder and co-editor of The American Prospect, and professor at Brandeis University's Heller School. His latest book is Can Democracy Survive Global Capitalism? In addition to writing for the Prospect, he writes for The Huffington Post, The Boston Globe, and the New York Review of Books. 

Follow Bob at his site, robertkuttner.com, and on Twitter. 

Recent Articles

Trump Is Right About NAFTA, But That Doesn’t Make Him Pro-Worker

Nathan Lambrecht/The Monitor via AP Crates of U.S. manufactured parts are prepared for shipment into Mexico at Freight Dispatch Service Agency LTD in Pharr, Texas. This article originally appeared at The Huffington Post. Subscribe here . A s a deadline for NAFTA negotiations set by House Speaker Paul Ryan came and went on May 17, Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin now says that the negotiations are still alive and might even extend into next year. Of course, President Donald Trump has undercut his senior aides before, and there is no telling what he might impulsively do if the mood strikes him. Previously, Trump had insisted that he would withdraw the U.S. from the North American Free Trade Agreement if negotiations were not concluded and approved by this session of Congress. By delaying NAFTA talks until after the November election, however, the GOP could avoid an awkward situation in which most of the NAFTA revisions demanded by Trump’s negotiators are supported by labor and the...

Trump’s Gratuitous Damage to Global Harmony

AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster President Donald Trump speaks at the North Side Gymnasium in Elkhart, Indiana T hat Nobel is likely to continue eluding President Trump. Consider his latest trade war with Europe. Are you concerned that Trump will win the Nobel Prize for making peace with North Korea’s Kim Jong-Un? You needn’t worry. Kim and Trump may stage the illusion of progress towards a de-nuclearized Korea. But the details of that goal will take long and arduous diplomacy. One risk is that Kim is setting a trap for Trump in which both leaders can claim success, but as negotiations drag on North Korea keeps working on its arsenal and its nuclear delivery vehicles. Trump, showman and cynic, may go along so that he can claim a diplomatic breakthrough. The opposite risk is that Trump will realize that he is being played, and will one-up Kim by walking out of the talks, thus adding to regional tensions. The one thing that will not happen is the immediate conclusion of a final and verifiable...

Birthday Greetings to Karl Marx

Harald Tittel/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images The Karl Marx Statue in Trier is revealed in a ceremony T his past weekend marked the 200th anniversary of Karl Marx, who was born in the German city of Trier on May 5, 1818. With more and more workers pushed aside by the latest brand of capitalism and more and more of the gains going to the top, it’s a good time to inquire if perhaps Marx might have been right after all. When I was first studying such things, Marx looked to me like an idiot. He was convinced that capitalism would collapse from its own contradictions, and then would give way to a workers’ paradise. But in postwar America and in much of the West, the proletariat was making steady gains. Far from turning revolutionary, workers were joining unions and supporting mainstream center-left political parties. Far from containing the seeds of its own destruction, capitalism in Europe and America had at last been harnessed in the broad public interest. The welfare state was spreading...

Is Trump Capable of Realism on North Korea?

Korea Summit Press Pool via AP North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and South Korean President Moon Jae-in shake hands after signing on a joint statement at the border village of Panmunjom in the Demilitarized Zone in South Korea. This article originally appeared at The Huffington Post. Subscribe here . I n the afterglow of the summit between the leaders of North and South Korea, as we await the even more historic meeting between President Donald Trump and Pyongyang’s Kim Jong-un, there are three distinct risks. One is that a genuine breakthrough occurs and Trump reaps the political credit. The New York Times ’s Maureen Dowd, tongue only partly in cheek, imagines Trump getting the Nobel Peace Prize . An opposite risk is that Trump wants a deal so badly that he is willing to be played for a fool. A number of conservative commentators have warned about this. Steven F. Hayes, in The Weekly Standard , warned , “Trump’s comments last week suggest he’s a sucker waiting to be played. The...

How the Tax Bill Backfired on the Republicans

Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call via AP Images House Speaker Paul Ryan and Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy conduct a news conference in Washington D id you have a happy Tax Day? Are you feeling grateful for the Republican tax cut? Evidently most American taxpayers are not . In a sublime case of poetic justice, the so-called Tax Cut and Jobs Act (TCJA) is backfiring on the Republicans big time. Most voters are unimpressed, and Republicans themselves are ceasing to emphasize it in their campaign material. In the March 13 special election for the Pennsylvania 18th House district, where Democrat Conor Lamb narrowly beat Republican Rick Saccone, Republicans actually pulled ads that bragged about the tax act, because their polls showed that it was more of a target than an achievement. Republican strategists who wanted President Trump to emphasize the tax cut this spring were initially annoyed that Trump was talking about trade, immigration and Korea instead. Now they realize that Trump may be onto...

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