Steven White

Steven White is a former TAP Online intern. He blogs at stevenwhite.typepad.com.

Recent Articles

RUDY GIULIANI: UBER NEOCON.

RUDY GIULIANI: UBER NEOCON. Via Dave Weigel comes the news that Norman Podhoretz is joining the Rudy Giuliani campaign as a senior foreign policy advisor. Earlier this year, Podhoretz wrote a cute little article in the Wall Street Journal arguing in favor of bombing Iran. In it, he begs Bush to "take the only action that can stop Iran from following through on its evil intentions both toward us and toward Israel. As an American and as a Jew, I pray with all my heart that he will." In other Giuliani news, it appears TAP Online is inadvertently aiding and abetting pro- Romney bloggers . --Steven White

HOLLYWOOD AND THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT

HOLLYWOOD AND THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT Ann Hornaday reflects on the new film Talk to Me in today's Washington Post , leading her to wonder why "the story of the most important social and political moment in this country's history has gone untold in its dominant narrative art form." Why, in other words, isn't there a major Hollywood film about the civil rights movement? This is different than a film set in the civil rights era . Such movies tend to have certain historical flaws. Hornaday aptly notes that Mississippi Burning "engaged in a certain degree of revisionism, valorizing the white investigators of the crimes rather than emphasizing the heroic stories of their nominal subjects." Forrest Gump , as she writes, "inserted its dim Candide of a protagonist into a trivialized pastiche of American social history, reducing the 1963 March on Washington to a 'Zelig'-like stunt." Compare the school integration scene in that film with the real life event it references and the degree to...

THE PARADOX OF MORAL EQUIVALENCE.

THE PARADOX OF MORAL EQUIVALENCE. Judea Pearl , Daniel Pearl 's father, wrote a review of A Mighty Heart for TNR Online . The film, which stars Angelina Jolie as his wife Mariane , tells the story of Daniel Pearl's capture and subsequent beheading in Karachi, Pakistan, in 2002. Reading the review is difficult, because it's a father writing about the portrayal of his murdered son. It's also difficult because I think in some places, Judea Pearl is misleading and wrong. On an emotional and moral level, his relation to his son makes it difficult to criticize his points. However, it also gives unfortunate credence to some problematic assertions. Pearl writes that he fears the film "falls into a trap Bertrand Russell would have recognized: the paradox of moral equivalence, of seeking to extend the logic of tolerance a step too far." He takes issue with the director's comparison of Daniel Pearl's circumstances with some things the United States is doing: You can see traces of this logic in...

EDWARDS AND THE...

EDWARDS AND THE NYT . A rather provocative article in The New York Times today makes John Edwards seem fairly shady. Because Edwards did not have the benefits of, say, a senate seat to maintain his name recognition, NYT staff writer Leslie Wayne declares: Mr. Edwards, who reported this year that he had assets of nearly $30 million, came up with a novel solution, creating a nonprofit organization with the stated mission of fighting poverty. The organization, the Center for Promise and Opportunity, raised $1.3 million in 2005, and -- unlike a sister charity he created to raise scholarship money for poor students -- the main beneficiary of the center's fund-raising was Mr. Edwards himself, tax filings show. The National Review crowd loves it , of course. But according to Greg Sargent , the article might be a little unfair. He writes that TPM "just learned something new and surprising about the story. The Edwards campaign has just told us on the record that The Times refused the chance to...

Scooter Libby: Best Samaritan Ever

Mulling a pardon, Mr. President? Just remember, Libby attended a friend's bachelor party and spoke at his neighbor's book club.

Earlier this month, I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby was sentenced to thirty months in prison and ordered to pay a $250,000 fine after he was convicted of perjury, obstruction of justice, and making false statements to federal investigators. On Thursday, Federal Judge Reggie B. Walton said he will not delay the sentence, which means Libby could be in prison within weeks. Prior to sentencing, various individuals sent several hundred pages of letters to the judge on Libby's behalf. Most made personal pleas for leniency by vouching for his good character. They are worth looking over one more time. Notable public figures like Donald Rumsfeld and Henry Kissinger provide the star power, but the real treasures often come from slightly less well-known sources, addressing issues one might perhaps characterize as tangential to the legal issues at hand. The testimonials did not seem to have much effect on the judge -- but just see if you, dear reader, can make it through these descriptions without...

Pages