Danny Feingold

Danny Feingold is publisher of Capital & Main and has written for the Los Angeles Times, The San Francisco Chronicle, Salon, and other publications.

Recent Articles

California Legislature Prepares to Rein In Gig Economy

If AB 5 becomes law, it could open the floodgates to similar legislation in other states. Uber and other companies may then find themselves on the defensive.

Rich Pedroncelli/Associated Press Supporters of California’s Assembly Bill 5, which would reverse the rampant worker misclassification occurring in industries from ride-share to trucking to retail and food delivery, rally in July at the Capitol in Sacramento. Capital & Main is an award-winning publication that reports from California on economic, political, and social issues. The American Prospect is co-publishing this piece. If you’re trying to make sense of the epic legislative battle underway in California pitting Uber, Lyft and their fellow gig economy employers against labor and its allies, consider the case of truck driver Daniel Linares. As Capital & Main reported in 2014, Linares, over the course of 20 days, hauled 110 cargo containers at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach for a company called Pacific 9 Transportation. His gross earnings for that period were $3,191—but his paycheck indicated that he actually owed Pacific 9 nearly $300, to cover...

‘How Long Will the LA Teachers Strike Last?’ May Be the Wrong Question

The walkout has led to a long overdue assessment of charter schools and forced a reconsideration of how much we are willing to invest in public education.

Capital & Main is an award-winning publication that reports from California on economic, political and social issues. The American Prospect is co-publishing this piece. In 1973, Philadelphia teachers went on strike for nearly two months. Cleveland teachers walked off the job in 2002 and didn’t come back for 62 days. Last year, teacher strikes in West Virginia and Oklahoma lasted 10 and nine days, respectively. Nevertheless, just three days after teachers hit the picket line in Los Angeles, the media started to frame the strike in dire terms. One headline in a prominent news outlet asked, “Are the kids all right? LA teachers strike drags into third day with no end in sight,” while another asserted, “LA teachers bask in support for strike, but pressure grows to settle amid financial losses.” It goes without saying that no one wants a protracted teachers strike; earlier today both sides agreed to return to the negotiating table, with LA Mayor Eric...

LA Teachers' Potential 'Meta-Strike' Reveals Battle Lines in U.S. Public Education War

Superintendent Austin Beutner and his allies have made it clear they do not believe that the LA Unified School District in its current incarnation is worth investing in—or even preserving.

Capital & Main is an award-winning publication that reports from California on economic, political and social issues. The American Prospect is co-publishing this piece. Sometimes strikes are exactly what they seem to be—battles over wages and working conditions, with relatively few implications for anything or anyone else. But sometimes a strike is about something much bigger: a fundamental clash over vision and values, with repercussions that extend far beyond the warring parties. Call it a meta-strike. If Los Angeles teachers walk off the job January 14, as widely expected, it will be a meta-strike with extremely high stakes not only for teachers, students and parents in LA, but for public education across the U.S. The stalemated negotiations over wages, class size, staffing and other issues matter—but they are proxies for an epic fight that has been playing out in American school districts for more than a decade. On one side of this divide are those who believe that...